Vegan Sausage, Apple, and Quinoa Stuffed Acorn Squash

I can never resist a pretty squash! And acorn are one of the cutest in my opinion because of the fluted shape. Better than that though, they have really large seeds that are very easy to scoop out, so it’s a regular at my house for getting twice baked and served in its shell. This acorn squash bake recipe is protein packed with veggie sausage and quinoa stuffed inside.

Which is better for you acorn squash or butternut squash?

Acorn squash comes out on top in many ways. It offers more folate, calcium, magnesium, and potassium than butternut, hubbard, and spaghetti squash. In fact, one cup of roasted acorn squash has more potassium (896 milligrams) than if you ate two medium bananas (844 mg), with around 40% fewer carbs.  And as with any deeply colored vegetable, acorn squash is rich in antioxidants.

Mealtime conversation starters

Two happy figs used as icons for conversation starters for dinner parties.

Have you ever thought of a question as being beautiful? Years ago I read a book by Warren Berger called The Book of Beautiful Questions. Being curious and asking questions is very rewarding when you are trying to create deeper connections with other people.

Even if you are skilled at asking beautiful questions, it is always nice to have a few in your back pocket. Here is the question to pair with this recipe:

If you could travel back in time, where would you go?

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Platter of Roasted Acorn Squash stuffed with vegan fillings
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4.84 from 6 votes

Vegan Sausage, Apple, and Quinoa Stuffed Acorn Squash

Healthy mix of sweet, savory, fall flavors. This vegan sausage, apple and quinoa stuffed acorn squash recipe is an all-in-one meal or a side for cool weather dinners.
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time1 hr
Total Time1 hr 15 mins
Servings: 4
Calories: 422
Course: Main Course, Side Dish
Cuisine: Vegan, Vegetarian

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Ingredients

  • 1 acorn squash halved, seeds scooped out
  • ½ cup quinoa cooked
  • 1 apple tart variety, diced
  • 1 red onion diced
  • 2 Field Roast Veggie Brat Italian or Apple-Sage flavor
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic minced
  • 1 tsp thyme
  • salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 350°F
  • Cut squash in half lengthwise, and scrape out the seeds.
  • Bake squash cut side down for 30-40 minutes, until just tender. (Line your baking dish or tray with parchment paper for easier cleanup.)
  • Meanwhile, chop the apple and brat finely, then in a large bowl, mix with the quinoa and all remaining ingredients.
  • When squashes are mostly baked but not totally soft, remove from oven and scoop out a little bit to make the cavity bigger. Mash that up and stir into the bowl of brat & apple quinoa stuffing, and pile the stuffing mixture back into the cavity (like a twice-baked potato).
  • Continue to bake for an additional 20 minutes, until the squash is fully tender. Serve hot or warm, right from the shell.

Notes

 
 

Hand Size Portions

Nutrition Facts
Vegan Sausage, Apple, and Quinoa Stuffed Acorn Squash
Amount per Serving
Calories
422
% Daily Value*
Fat
 
7
g
11
%
Saturated Fat
 
1
g
6
%
Trans Fat
 
0
g
Cholesterol
 
0
mg
0
%
Sodium
 
292
mg
13
%
Potassium
 
1270
mg
36
%
Carbohydrates
 
75
g
25
%
Fiber
 
9
g
38
%
Sugar
 
14
g
16
%
Protein
 
20
g
40
%
Vitamin A
 
840
IU
17
%
Vitamin C
 
32
mg
39
%
Calcium
 
129
mg
13
%
Iron
 
4
mg
22
%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
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Hand Portions

When you look at the nutritional values of a meal to log what you are eating, that is called tracking macros. A lot of people use this method to reach their health goals.

Looking at hand portion size and using this method to gauge how and what you eat is also a great method to help you reach your health goals. Many people who use this method often think this form of tracking meals is easier and more sustainable for a lifetime.

Want to learn more about hand portion size and how to use it to reach your goals? Check out the article How to Get Started with Hand Portion Sizes.

Heather Lynn Darby helps office and tech professionals disrupt the cycle of chronic stress that undermines their health, and to recover from the negative effects of sitting at a computer all day. Find other articles written by Heather on her coach profile.

If you are largely sedentary at work and rely on your intellectual acumen for success, her take on body-mind interventions will help you find a balance between being "in the zone" and getting the amount of movement that will optimize your mental productivity and prevent health problems.